29 thoughts on “Going back in time …

  1. trishsplace Nov 24, 2020 / 11:57

    One egg per fortnight? I have one every day, a staple of my diet. Well, I guess I’d have survived?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Christine Goodnough Nov 24, 2020 / 12:35

    Lest we forget…
    And speaking of toilet paper, I suppose the grade of newsprint used in the war years was poor enough to work fairly well? Or did you all have indoor plumbing by then?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Keith's Ramblings Nov 24, 2020 / 12:49

      I hope you are not suggesting I was around then Christine! Okay, I admit there was this rationing when I was a baby!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Christine Goodnough Nov 24, 2020 / 13:15

        I thought your parents would have talked of “the good old days.” My birth parents didn’t have indoor plumbing, so even I can tell my grands about “the good old days f the Sears catalogue.” 😉
        I gather rationing went on for a long time after the war, well into the 50s. Have you read the book 84 Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff? Very interesting!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Keith's Ramblings Nov 24, 2020 / 14:00

        They rarely spoke of them Christine and I never actually asked them much about it. I was born at the end of the ’40, so yes it was happening. I’ve heard of the book but not read it – I think I should!

        Liked by 1 person

  3. hilarymb Nov 24, 2020 / 14:24

    Hi Keith – yes little was said of those days … yet we made use of everything and never threw things away. Toilet paper – Izal … the hard stuff … actually in the War I think they used newsprint (coal tar) too – especially in childbirth … as it had anti-bacterial properties. How they had to make do … and forage … as well as walk or bike everywhere … few cars. Take care – those were the days … thankfully not mine. All the best – Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

    • Keith's Ramblings Nov 24, 2020 / 17:20

      I’d forgotten about Izal, it was like greasepaper! And we think we’ve got it bad now. It doesn’t compare. Cheers Hilary.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. messymimi's meanderings Nov 25, 2020 / 01:55

    My understanding is that it was very difficult, but that as a group, the British people were at their healthiest ever under rationing.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Sandee Nov 25, 2020 / 14:37

    Well done. My thought was no good deed goes unpunished.

    Have a fabulous day, Keith. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Junie Nov 25, 2020 / 19:06

    Near the bottom of the list it gets worse! Heard from a blogger in the UK they used newspaper as toilet paper. My parents were in Japanese intern camp and got one, sometimes 2 bowls of rice per day. When I was young I always knew whose parents of my friends had still issues about the war. Food (and especially not liking a certain food) was a big thing!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Keith's Ramblings Nov 26, 2020 / 12:19

      The newspare/toilet paper thing is still talked about, especially during the recent panic buying of loo rolls which saw supermarket shelves empty! Thanks for your interesting comment Junie.

      Like

      • Junie Nov 27, 2020 / 02:11

        This strange subject has not yet died on this side of the pond either! It (toiet paper) was today at the thanksgiving table brought up by the millennials among us:)

        Liked by 1 person

      • Keith's Ramblings Nov 27, 2020 / 10:52

        Judging by the standard of some of our newspapers, that’s probably still the best use for them!

        Like

      • Junie Nov 27, 2020 / 15:58

        Haha, that’s a good one!

        Like

  7. Kathe W. Nov 26, 2020 / 21:59

    Oh my gosh- I cannot imagine…one must have had ( I hope ) a Victory Garden? Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

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